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Canta U Populu Corsu - Barbara Furtuna

Corsican

Barbara Furtuna

O Barbara furtuna, sorte ingrata
À tutti ci ammollisce il cor in pettu
Pensendu à quella libertà passata.
 
Hè pur ghjuntu quellu ghjornu, di funestu,
D'abbandunà piacè per li turmenti,
O Diu! chì tristu ghjornu hè per mè questu!
 
Addiu Corsica, madre tantu amanta,
Nel separar di tè senza ritornu,
O chì dulor nell'anima scunsulata
 
Submitted by Tiho_10 on Fri, 14/10/2011 - 13:18
Last edited by Hampsicora on Wed, 30/09/2015 - 21:57
Thanks!

 

 

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Translations of "Barbara Furtuna"
Canta U Populu Corsu: Top 3
Comments
Guest    Fri, 06/01/2012 - 18:27

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This is not really Italian, it is corse dialect. (see Wikipedia [new page] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corsican_language)

Corses would absolutely say "language", but Linguists agree that, only after the tuscanian dialect (from which the modern Italian has been developed) this is the closest to Italian so that, by an italian point of view, besides I don't know the corse dialect at all, it perfectly sounds "Italian" showing a mixture of sounds linking sicilian and sardinians dialects (typically, the final "U") and south-Tuscanian / Latial dialects (cutting an Infinitive with an accented vowel - like in andare ["to go"] = andà, annà) which have given their typical sound to the Catalan. Besides all, Corsica can be even considered "Italy" as a matter of facts, although History has made it "farther" than it really is.

[LyricsTranslate has a specific page for Sardinian: [new window] https://lyricstranslate.com/en/language/sardinian]

An interesting document about the corse dialect (of course ... in Corse) can be found here [new window] http://www.accademiacorsa.org/linguacorsa.html