Brest (English translation)

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English translation

Brest

Do you hate me now
for daring leave Brest1 one day?
The harbour, the port or what's left of it,
the wind in Jean Jaurès Avenue.
I know we were that close of making it.
We were done eating our youth away,
we could have eaten up the leftovers
even in the middle of a downpour.
 
This bloody thunder keeps rolling over Brest2.
Make this goddamn rain stop!
This bloody thunder keeps rolling over Brest
Even the earth is keeling over.
 
The deserted Recouvrance
Siam Street and its drunken nights
This is not a lack of manners,
just the clouds and your caresses getting worn out.
 
This is not a manifesto,
not even a lecture, even less a preaching.
But I was bound to go extinct3 some day.
Must we always protect the species?
 
This bloody thunder keeps rolling over Brest.
Make this goddamn rain stop!
This bloody thunder keeps rolling over Brest.
Make this goddamn rain stop!
This bloody thunder keeps rolling over Brest
Even the earth is keeling over.
This bloody thunder keeps rolling over Brest
Does it devastate you too?
 
Does it devastate you too,
this handful of ashes we scatter?
Does at least someone soothe you now?
 
  • 1. the French city in Brittany
  • 2. "Tonnerre de Brest" is one of the favourite curses of Cpt. Haddock, Tintin's famous sidekick. I can't see how that pun could be translated
  • 3. that's a bit hard to get even for a native, but the idea is that he vanished like a species go extinct. "disparaître" can have both meanings
Submitted by ingirumimusnocte on Fri, 26/10/2018 - 23:09
Added in reply to request by Igeethecat
Last edited by ingirumimusnocte on Wed, 31/10/2018 - 22:17
Author's comments:

This good old Miossec. As cheerful as always Regular smile

French

Brest

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Comments
Igeethecat    Sat, 27/10/2018 - 05:13

“Someone stops that rain, Got damn it!” — does it actually mean “Someone, please stop this God damn rain!” ?
It just sounds like someone stops the rain and the author is very upset about that Wink smile

ingirumimusnocte    Sat, 27/10/2018 - 05:15

Ah yes, I hadn't thought of that. I'll change it.

Igeethecat    Sat, 27/10/2018 - 05:24

You still have that pesky little “s” in “Stop it!” (It is a command!) Cry smile

ingirumimusnocte    Sat, 27/10/2018 - 05:37

I supose @Gavin will have the final say, but I think it's rather an indicative, I couldn't say why, but I hear the 's' when I think of it.
You're probably right, but I'd rather have a native explanation to get rid of that error once and for all.

Gavin    Wed, 31/10/2018 - 22:06

Ah yes, "someone please stop the rain" - imperative. To mirror the French use of "que". Literally something like "let it be that the rain stops" but that sounds very unusual. Regular smile
You could also say something like "make this goddamn rain stop!"