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Trova, trovadores, trovadas in Cuba

6 posts / 0 new
Junior Member
Joined: 31.08.2018
Pending moderation

I've been researching trova, trovada and trovadores in Wikipedia, on YouTube and in various dictionaries.

Do trovadores wander in the sense of one location one day, another the next? Or do they wander from place to place within a day? Or do they pick a restaurant and wander from table to table for tips? In what sense was Faustino Oramas a trovador?

What's the difference between trova and bolero?

I'm having a hard time understanding what a trovador is. Is there something popular in the US that you could compare it to?

Moderator / hippie-abraça-árvore
Joined: 30.04.2014

Maybe like folk musicians in the US?

Junior Member
Joined: 31.08.2018

Hmmm, maybe, thanks.

Editor .
Joined: 09.10.2018

That's originally a name for musicians that went from castle to castle to entertain nobility in the Middle Ages.
They don't exist anymore.
You can still use the name today, but only as a metaphor. A singing poet or something like that.

Moderator / hippie-abraça-árvore
Joined: 30.04.2014

In Cuba they had the "Nueva trova" movement of singer-songwriters...

Junior Member
Joined: 31.08.2018

The Wikipedia article on "troubadour" makes it sound like theyre not around anymore, but check out the Wikipedia article on "trova": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trova . As an interesting comparison, note Buena Vista Social Club's 'Camino a vereda' in which Ferrer calls his song a "trovada". Also Gloria Estefan sings in Tus Ojos that his ojos are like "guitarras trovadoras de San Juan".

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