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Help with French lyrics

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Moderator Liebe ist die beste Medizin
Joined: 09.09.2014
Pending moderation

Hi! I need help with a French lyrics of this song:
https://lyricstranslate.com/en/safe-digga-safe-buddy.html

This is the French portion:

Citation :

La vie te fout à terre, te plaque la gueule au sol.
Elle te fait des misères. La vie, voilà, où nous en sommes.
Sur la vie de leurs mères, ils jurent et se la collent.
Jacques a dit à Pierre qu'ils n'ont jamais retrouvé Paul.

Et si tu tombes, tombes, tombes
Et si tu tombes, tombes, tombes
Je serai là, la-la-la, la-la-la
Je serai là, la-la-la, la-la-la.

Can someone translate it from French to English? Please!
Thank you!

Editor
Joined: 31.12.2013

It should be: Je serai là., without the final 's'.

Super Member
Joined: 01.07.2018

I'll take the second stanza Regular smile
And if you fall, fall, fall,
And if you fall, fall, fall,
I shall be there, la-la-la, la-la-la
I shall be there, la-la-la, la-la-la

(Enough hard work for today.)

Editor
Joined: 31.12.2013

I shall be there is far too formal for this song. I will be there is enough.

Moderator Liebe ist die beste Medizin
Joined: 09.09.2014
Jadis wrote:

I'll take the second stanza Regular smile
And if you fall, fall, fall,
And if you fall, fall, fall,
I shall be there, la-la-la, la-la-la
I shall be there, la-la-la, la-la-la

(Enough hard work for today.)

Second stanza added!
Thank you very much! Regular smile

Super Member
Joined: 01.07.2018

True, even perhaps, "I'll be there". I am puzzled with the 3rd line : "Sur la vie de leurs mères, ils jurent et se la collent." The first part ("Sur la vie de leurs mères" sounds like an French-Arabic saying, like in "it's true, I swear it on my my mother's head" ?
"Ils jurent" : I suppose that here it means that "they are swearing" (or perhaps "cursing" ?)
"et se la collent" : normally, it means something like "and they have to cope with it" (with life, I suppose).
It doesn't seem to make too much sense to me, although the verse rhymes (sol / collent).

Novice
Joined: 02.09.2018

Your translation is correct.
concerning the expression "et se la collent" it means they drink until they get drunk, I suppose.

Super Member
Joined: 01.07.2018

Seems that you're right, I had never heard this expression before, I'm probably too old for that ! Whatchutalkingabout smile But one can find it on the Internet.
 

Editor
Joined: 18.10.2015

Life bangs you to the ground and you lie with your ass in the dirt
Life brings you only misery. Life, voila, that's exactly where we are now.
They swear by their mothers' lives and then get deadly drunk
A young French girl told her black boyfriend that they had never been humble idiots

(Internet memes. Jacque - a sweet French girl, Pierre - a black Frenchman involved in gangs fight and possibly a drug dealer, Paul - a stupid humble retarded idiot)

Super Member
Joined: 01.07.2018

This goes beyond my cultural field of competence   :/  but I'm puzzled with "Jacque" being "a sweet French girl". Jacques is a male Christian name (the female equivalent might be Jacqueline for ex.) As far as I know, no French girl would be called Jacques. Although "the times they are a-changing", of course...

Editor
Joined: 18.10.2015

As an internet meme it's short for Jacqueline- Jacque I was surprised, too

Moderator Liebe ist die beste Medizin
Joined: 09.09.2014
sandring wrote:

Life bangs you to the ground and you lie with your ass in the dirt
Life brings you only misery. Life, voila, that's exactly where we are now.
They swear by their mothers' lives and then get deadly drunk
A young French girl told her black boyfriend that they had never been humble idiots

(Internet memes. Jacque - a sweet French girl, Pierre - a black Frenchman involved in gangs fight and possibly a drug dealer, Paul - a stupid humble retarded idiot)

Mmm... interesting translation!
Thank you very much for the translation.
I've posted the rest of the French part here; although, I'm not sure if the footnote in the stanza 4 I've explained it properly.

Guest

I must say I also find this "ils se la collent" a bit hard to get.
It could mean "they get wasted" or "they stick it up their asses" or "they endure it" (a bit more likely in this context).

"Jacques a dit" is like "Simon says", and "Pierre, Paul, Jacques" is an idiomatic way of saying "every man and his dog". The whole line means something like "people are milling around without a clue".

My take:

Life knocks you on your ass, it slams your face in the dirt,
It's mean to you, life is. That's where we stand now.
They swear on their mothers' heads and endure it
Simon says Bob is nobody's uncle.

But if you fall, fall, fall
...
I'll be there (for you)
...

Super Member
Joined: 01.07.2018

There is even a French singer who uses the name Pierpoljak

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