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Which French category is this in?

18 posts / 0 new
Senior Member
Joined: 21.10.2018
Pending moderation

I admit I am very VERY bad at French (like EVERYTHING about it) so maybe I overlooked something here. I wanted to add a new song but I did not see this language and it didn't feel right for me to add it to the "French" category. The French language that I could not find is called: Canadian French or Quebec French whichever you want to call it I couldn't find it in the language selections. My question is: did I overlook something?

Junior Member
Joined: 19.09.2017

The last time I checked the languages are grouped alphabetically first by frequency, and later the remaining languages that aren't so frequent are at the end and so they are grouped alphabetically after that. I wouldn't hesitate to put it in the French language option seeing as how they are both the same language.

Editor .
Joined: 09.10.2018

There is a Canadian French option, but it's located in the rare languages section.
You'll have to scroll the language list all the way to the bottom and pick the last choice.
That will open a new list where you will find the little rascal at last.

As for the languages being the same, Canadian French is usually quite understandable, but can be pretty hard to get at times.
For instance, I've been waiting for a translation of this song for months.
It sounds quite funny and I can understand maybe 2/3 of it, but some parts are just too far from standard French for me to guess even the general idea.

Super Member
Joined: 29.02.2016

I agree with you, with just a little bit of imagination, written 'Canadian French' is quite understandable, and I would not say it's distinct from French. In l'Agaspésie, take that verse: 'Pis y m'on asperger (...)', it's nothing else than "Et puis ils m'ont aspergé (...)", each of the four words being misspelled. How could a translation of the song in any language take those misspellings into account ??

Senior Member
Joined: 21.10.2018

Good point

Moderator sapiens sapiens
Joined: 05.04.2012

We have the following categories for variants of French: French (Antillean Creole) / French (Haitian Creole) / French (Indian French) / French (Louisiana Creole French) / French (Middle French) / French (Old French) / French (Picard) / French (Réunion Creole) - historical forms or dialects.

I don't know French enough to say if Québécois is different enough from standard French to make space for a standalone category (same thing works for European and Brazilian Portuguese, which is commonly asked for). If the text is understandable, then it can be marked just as 'French'.

Editor .
Joined: 09.10.2018

Was there a recent overhaul of the language list?
I could have sworn there was a Canadian French entry only a few months ago, I remember using it once.

Super Member
Joined: 01.07.2018

I would say that for ex :

"Met tes bobettes arrete de faire l'agace pipi
Embarque dans l'char on sacre le camp en Gaspésie"

is typically Canadian French. No French people would ever use, nor even understand, "bobettes" for underwear. Few would understand what "agace-pipi" (sexual teasing) means, or that "char" means "car", and "sacrer le camp", "fiche le camp". But the orthograph of the lyrics is questionable, I can see no reason why one should write "ca vaux ben l'cout" when the "correct" spelling would be "ça vaut ben l'coup".

Super Member
Joined: 29.02.2016

'Char' in the sense of 'car' is perfectly understood in France, and 'agace-pipi' is quite obvious Regular smile ... I agree with you that most French people do not know the meaning of the word 'bobettes'. But lots of other French words are unknown to me, including numerous words typical of the different French provinces. Should we then recognize tens of different local 'French languages' in addition to the three 'Canadian French' i.e. 'francais du Québec', 'français d'Acadie', and 'français de Terre-Neuve' ? I don't really see the point.

Editor
Joined: 31.12.2013

Canadian French is not a language, simply a variety of the French language as there are American English and British English.

About 'French (Haitian Creole)', I can't understand how the Haitian (Creole) language can be processed as French; it is a language of its own.

Haitian Creole: mwen remen ou. Sa se telefòn il.
French: Je t'aime. Ceci est son téléphone.

Again, Canadian French and 'French without a regional adjective' are not two different languages...

Super Member
Joined: 01.07.2018

Actually, I have difficulties to understand some people from Québec (not all of them, rather the ones living in the country). When you begin to understand no more what your interlocutor says, you might ask yourself : is it still the same language ? Not only the pronunciation is very special (for us), but they also use local (or old) "French" words, and then they mix English-American words... Yet if you talk to educated people, usually it's still understandable. But I think it will diverge more and more in the future.

Nowadays, French people understand each other (this has not always been the case in the past) because they all watch the same TV channels, where standardized French rules more or less - although it is also evoluting : for example the "liaisons" will soon belong to a bygone time... But the Canadians don't watch the French channels.

Editor
Joined: 31.12.2013

Even among French people, there can be some misunderstanding and there are regional differences. What about adding Swiss French and Belgian French? Or American English and British English?

Once you're used to talking to Canadians and know the main differences, there's no probkem. Don't forget that from their point of you, it's European French speakers who use funny sounding words or a very posh way to speak. French Canadians are usually more used to European French thanks to films and now the Internet and therefore they can understand Europeans, but it's not without some adaptation time.

What is spoken in Canada/Québec is French.

Editor .
Joined: 09.10.2018

Belgian or Swiss variations are very small, it's comparable to American vs British English. Except for the way of counting you often can't tell the difference.
The French from Québec might require frequent dictionary lookups and recognizing numerous borrowed English idioms. That's what I call significant differences, even though grammar and syntax remain the same.
I make no stand about what French symbolizes in Quebec or whether philologists should consider it a different language.
It just might be a courtesy to the casual reader to indicate that a particular song comes from Quebec, so that someone learning French would not be confused, for instance.

Senior Member
Joined: 21.10.2018

Yeah I was thinking that too about the Haitian Creole language being called "French". I admit I do not like using the term " Canadian French" either.

Senior Member
Joined: 21.10.2018

I have noticed that too with Canadians and i f I remember correctly at some point Canada didn't like the French used in many Disney movies so the movies were put into French for Canada. I noticed the English American words in a song from Pokémon!

Senior Member
Joined: 21.10.2018

Hmmm I think I have left this topic open long enough. I didn't want to put Canadian French in the category called Other because as popular as the French language is, I was sure that somebody would "correct me". I decided to experiment with 2 other languages. The languages were Brazilian Portuguese and Portuguese Portugal. I also lurked around to find out how other people title their well titles too. Like with Swiss the title had said *insert song title here* Swiss selected category German. So the final title read "*insert song title here* Swiss German". So I think I will put any songs I find in " Canadian French" into the French category but any time I get a chance I'll ask for both the French and the English translations to be proofread. One thing I do know about "Canadian French" is that the spelling of words can be very different than its French counterpart. (I found that out the hard way with Latino Spanish and Spanish from Spain). So any final comments or thoughts?

stupid error messages!

Editor
Joined: 31.12.2013

Just to be clear:
The spelling of Canadian French and European French are the same. There is no difference like the ones found in English colour/color, etc.

Senior Member
Joined: 21.10.2018

Ugh! It is only different spellings because I can not spell worth a darn!

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