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Magalenha/Sergio Mendes/traz a senha pro fogão..

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Junior Member
Joined: 31.08.2018
Pending moderation

Hello. I see that "traz a senha pro fogão" is translated on this website as either "bring the password to the oven" or "bring the sign to the oven". But, what does that mean? Does it refer to a custom or what? Thanks!

Leader of the Balkan Squad
Joined: 14.10.2016

I'm not sure what you mean; in both English translations it's along the lines of "bring the firewood to the oven".

Junior Member
Joined: 31.08.2018

I don't know Portuguese, so I'm going by the transcription and the two translations on this website. These would have me believe that "traz a LENHA pro fogão" means "bring the firewood to the oven", but "traz a SENHA pro fogão" means 'bring the password/sign'. Do lenha and senha mean the same thing, essentially?

Leader of the Balkan Squad
Joined: 14.10.2016

Metaphorically, yes. Since "senha" can also mean "sign" or "signal", it could be a metaphor for sending a smoke signal.

Moderator sapiens sapiens
Joined: 05.04.2012

I disagree - I've never seen 'senha' being used for a synonym of 'sign' or 'signal'. Not even in metaphorical speaking.

This word seems out of context in the song's lyrics, so I'll check the song to see if it's right or if it's a typo.

Moderator sapiens sapiens
Joined: 05.04.2012

I just heard the song and he does say 'senha' in a couple of stanzas (in the first one he says 'lenha' with an 'L'). It's a very uncommon usage of this word, I must say. Based on song context, I'd translate it as 'Bring your secret to the oven, as 'senhas' are meant to be occult, unknown to others.

Moments where he says 'Lenha': 0:13, 0: 29.
Moments where he says 'Senha': 0:58, 1:15, 2:31, 2:48.

The lines where 'Lenha' was translated as 'firewood' are correct.

I'm also pretty sure he says 'Traz a senha do fogão', would would mean something like 'Bring the password to the oven', as if the oven was something unusual, that only people with its password would be able to deal with properly. It's like a cooking touch or gift, if I may guess, but that's a confusing line. Which is not a surprise because it was written by Carlinhos Brown (who despite being an amazing writer, puts some weird words and things out of context in his songs).

Junior Member
Joined: 31.08.2018

Wow! Thank you for all your time and effort.

In my culture (US), many of us have "secret recipes" or a "secret" ingredient, meaning we won't tell anyone how we make our food so delicious.

Also in my culture, "occult" can mean spiritism or the devil. Please confirm that when you say "occult", it is only in the sense of 'hidden' or 'secret'.

But it makes sense that these might just be "weird words" because clearly he is taking rhyme to a complex level. He needed a word to rhyme with senha that fit the context. This would not be easy.

Again, many thanks.

Moderator sapiens sapiens
Joined: 05.04.2012

You're welcome.

Maybe he is mentioning a secret recipe, but there's not too much context. It's a guess, but makes sense...

Junior Member
Joined: 31.08.2018

Okay, thank you again for your time and input.

Novice
Joined: 07.04.2018

Adding to what was already said, it's quite common for certain Brazilian musicians to add words into their lyrics that are seemingly very out of place (at the top of my mind I can think of the band Skank's song "Dois Rios"). That can make them look quite confusing! It is generally so just to make a word play, as noted by Alma Barroca, often by creating metaphors and/or taking advantage of similar sounds, as in this case. Hope this helps ^^

Junior Member
Joined: 31.08.2018

Yes, it does. If two people agree, it adds weight to their conclusion. Thank you for adding.

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