Renaud - J'ai embrassé un flic (English translation)

English translation

I hugged a cop

There were millions of us
between République and Nation
Protestants and Catholics
Muslims, Jews and atheists
Under the benevolent gaze
of a few thousand cops
in solidarity with Charlie 1
 
And then I saw marching by
a few notorious crooks
Presidents, undersecretaries
and other inglorious bigwigs
and I saw, and I saw
a cop standing by the pavement
with a friendly air
So, I walked up to him
and I hugged a cop 2
 
I hugged a cop
between Nation and République
I hugged a cop
It makes a change from truncation blows
Thirty years ago I’d never have believed
that rather than flinging
cobbles at them with all my might
I’d hug one to my chest
Because I walked up to him
Yes, I walked up to him
and I hugged a cop
 
We were marching towards Nation
fraternal and peaceful
Under the benevolent gaze
of a few thousand cops
And the snipers on the roofs
made gestures of friendship
and solidarity
with their arms
So, to thank them
and for the first time
in my anarchist’s life
I went and hugged a cop
 
Yes, I walked up to him
and I hugged a cop
Yes, I walked up to him
and I hugged a cop
Yes, I walked up to him
and I hugged a cop
Yes, I walked up to him
and I hugged a cop
and I hugged a cop
 
  • 1. The 12 journalists at Charlie Hebdo who were murdered in 2015
  • 2. Of course "embrasser" generally means "kiss" but that doesn't feel right here. I feel he approached him and took him in his arms. There may well have been a little cheek-kiss too. In fact, Renaud said in an interview "Je n’ai pas à proprement parler 'embrassé un flic', mais je lui ai fait une accolade, presque enlacé en lui tapant dans le dos et en bredouillant un merci…" - "I didn't in actual fact 'kiss' a policemen, but I embraced him, practically hugging him as I patted him on the back and muttered a thank you"
Submitted by Gavin on Wed, 07/02/2018 - 10:56
Last edited by Gavin on Thu, 08/02/2018 - 16:21
French

J'ai embrassé un flic

More translations of "J'ai embrassé un ..."
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Comments
Gavin    Wed, 07/02/2018 - 11:10

interessant! Regular smile
Mais... "alors qu’en Angleterre c’est plutôt les "grasshoppers"" - C'est du bidon ça!

Pigs/cops/coppers/the filth...

(possible that "grasshoppers" is rhyming slang for "coppers" but I have never, ever heard it)

Gavin    Thu, 08/02/2018 - 11:04

is "les condés" used much? I don't think I've heard that one.
It's usually flics/keufs in the cop dramas I watch Regular smile

Gavin    Thu, 08/02/2018 - 14:14

What a cheeky young bunch of scamps! Regular smile

petit élève    Fri, 09/02/2018 - 10:39

Not as good as the one about hunters though.

"To hunt is to commune with Lady Nature as dawn's silver rays pierce shrouds of mist"
"So you need to have a poet's soul to be a hunter?"
"Fuck yeah, can't do without one!"

"How would you tell a good hunter from a bad hunter?"
"The bad hunter, it's this guy with a gun who will shoot at anything that moves"
"And what about the good hunter?"
"The good hunter, it's this guy with a gun who will shoot at anything that moves. But he's good!"

petit élève    Fri, 09/02/2018 - 10:14

"condés" is a bit dated, you'd rather hear that in movies from the 50's.

In the 80's you could hear "chtars" (from "je te harponne" -> chtarponne -> chtar Teeth smile ) or "duls" (no idea where that came from)

The trendy word in the suburbs when I played the social worker was "les schmidts".
Don't know where that came from, that sounds more like something you would use for Germans, but I heard a lot of teenagers use it.

Gavin    Fri, 09/02/2018 - 10:20

Ah harponne because that's like "nab". The "nabbers" Regular smile

Or the "I gotcha's" ... The Igors - Could catch on... Wink smile

Gavin    Fri, 09/02/2018 - 14:38

Encore avec les forgerons! Wink smile

Sarasvati    Fri, 09/02/2018 - 14:46

je ne connaissais pas schmitt ,sauf les gens de l'est, il y a beaucoup de nom en schmitt.
forgerons oui,mais qui font des menottes

Gavin    Wed, 18/04/2018 - 20:55

Le lardu!

petit élève    Wed, 18/04/2018 - 21:01

Haha yes, that one is quite funny though a bit dated. That's genuine 19th century argot.

Gavin    Wed, 18/04/2018 - 21:56

I'm watching an 80s movie called La Balance and a guy just said:
"Ça sent le lardu!" Regular smile

petit élève    Wed, 18/04/2018 - 21:59

Argot was still quite lively in the 80's. You can hear a lot of it, mixed with verlan, in movies of that era.
It only was superseded by rap yoofspeak in the 90's.